Multiple Spacecraft See First Solar X-Flare of 2013 | Video

VideoFromSpaceReport

Published on May 13, 2013

NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured an X-1.7-class flare on May 13th, 2013 and STEREO-B recorded the ensuing coronal mass ejection. — As an added bonus, a massive prominence erupted from near the southwestern limb of the Sun.

Solar Rain of Fire, in 4k (UHD)

SpaceRipReport

Published on May 2, 2013

This 4k UHD video captures what may be the most spectacular solar event ever witnessed. On July 19, 2012, an eruption occurred on the sun that produced a moderately powerful solar flare and coronal mass ejection. It produced a dazzling magnetic display known as coronal rain. Hot plasma in the corona cooled and condensed along strong magnetic fields that extended out from the solar surface. Charged plasma is forced to move along the lines, showing up brightly in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength of 304 Angstroms, and outlining the fields as it slowly rains back down onto the solar surface.

The video was uploaded at 3840×2160 UHD resolution. The Youtube player cuts that in half, but you can always download it at full res on your spiffy new 4k screen. Or wait till Apple releases its 4k iTV.

Music by Kevin Macleod (“Decisions”) and DigitalR3public (“Restart”).

 

NASA SDO – Three Years of SDO Images

LittleSDOHMIReport

Published on Apr 22, 2013

In the three years since it first provided images of the sun in the spring of 2010, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has had virtually unbroken coverage of the Sun’s rise toward solar maximum, the peak of solar activity in its regular 11-year cycle. This video shows those three years of the sun at a pace of two images per day. Each image is displayed for two frames at a 29.97 frame rate.
SDO’s Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) captures a shot of the Sun every 12 seconds in 10 different wavelengths. The images shown here are based on a wavelength of 171 Angstroms, which is in the extreme ultraviolet range and shows solar material at around 600,000 Kelvin. In this wavelength it is easy to see the sun’s 25-day rotation as well as how solar activity has increased over three years.

During the course of the video, the sun subtly increases and decreases in apparent size. This is because the distance between the SDO spacecraft and the sun varies over time. The image is, however, remarkably consistent and stable despite the fact that SDO orbits the Earth at 6,876 miles per hour and the Earth orbits the Sun at 67,062 miles per hour.

Such stability is crucial for scientists, who use SDO to learn more about our closest star. These images have regularly caught solar flares and coronal mass ejections in the act, types of space weather that can send radiation and solar material toward Earth and interfere with satellites in space. SDO’s glimpses into the violent dance on the Sun help scientists understand what causes these giant explosions — with the hopes of some day improving our ability to predict this space weather.

The four wavelength view at the end of the video shows light at 4500 Angstroms, which is basically the visible light view of the sun, and reveals sunspots; light at 193 Angstroms which highlights material at 1 million Kelvin and reveals more of the sun’s corona; light at 304 Angstroms which highlights material at around 50,000 Kelvin and shows features in the transition region and chromosphere of the sun; and light at 171 Angstroms.

Noteworthy events that appear briefly in the main sequence of this video:

00:30;24 Partial eclipse by the moon

00:31;16 Roll maneuver

01:11;02 August 9, 2011 X6.9 Flare, currently the largest of this solar cycle

01:28;07 Comet Lovejoy, December 15, 2011

01:42;29 Roll Maneuver

01:51;07 Transit of Venus, June 5, 2012

02:28;13 Partial eclipse by the moon

Credit: NASA SDO